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Date :  2016-01-27
Language :  English
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Corruption perceptions index 2015



Based on expert opinion, the Corruption Perceptions Index measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption worldwide.
Dark red indicates a highly corrupt public sector. Lighter red and orange countries fare a bit better, but corruption among public institutions and employees is still common. Yellow countries are perceived as cleaner, but not perfect.
The scale of the issue is huge. Sixty-eight per cent of countries worldwide have a serious corruption problem. Half of the G20 are among them.
Not one single country, anywhere in the world, is corruption-free.


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